Research

Land Value Uplift and TOD in Toronto

Rapid transit projects that increase accessibility should result in a localised land value uplift (LVU) benefit for locations near stations. A rich history of research has tested this hypothesis, generally operationalising transit accessibility by proxy through distance from a transit station. However, a growing body of research has also demonstrated LVU effects from transit-oriented development (TOD) as individuals sort themselves into locations that best match their preferences and willingness to pay.

Continue reading “Land Value Uplift and TOD in Toronto”

Mindset and Mindshare for EVs

The study presents a multi-group structural equation modelling exercise to identify differences in the mindset of individuals towards electric vehicles (EVs) across seven vehicle body types in Canada. The study utilizes a sample of 15,392 households and grounds the psychographic orientation of potential EV adopters on an extended version of the Theory of Planned Behaviour.

Continue reading “Mindset and Mindshare for EVs”

The $1.3B Health Impacts of Weekday Traffic

Little work has accounted for congestion, using data that reflects driving patterns, traffic volume, and speed, to examine the association between traffic emissions and human health. In this study, we performed a health risk assessment of PM2.5 emissions during congestion periods in the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area (GTHA), Canada.

Continue reading “The $1.3B Health Impacts of Weekday Traffic”

Review: Electric Mobility and Human Health

There is a growing need for a broad overview of the state of knowledge on the environmental aspects of Electric Vehicles (EVs), which could help policymakers in the objective of making road transportation more sustainable and environmentally-friendly. This study provides a comprehensive review of the effects of EV adoption on air quality, greenhouse gas emissions, and human health. Specifically, we (i) synthesized relevant published literature related to environmental implication of EVs, (ii) quantitatively evaluated the effect of EVs on environment and human health, and (iii) identified research gaps and recommend future research areas for the adoption of EVs and their benefits to society.

Continue reading “Review: Electric Mobility and Human Health”

Vehicle Body Type and Consumer Preferences for EVs

Electric vehicles (EVs) hold great promise for reducing greenhouse gas emissions, yet achieving their environmental benefits depends on greater market uptake. While a grow- ing body of literature has sought to offer information on consumer stated preferences for EVs, to date no research has examined how preferences for hybrid, plug-in hybrid, and battery electric vehicles are shaped by vehicle body size or type. The automobile market is differentiated with vehicle attributes that respond to heterogeneous consumer demands. We hypothesize that each bundle of attributes as it relates to vehicle body size also shapes demand for EVs.

Continue reading “Vehicle Body Type and Consumer Preferences for EVs”

Congestion and Commute Satisfaction

Despite decades of research, it is unclear under which circumstances travel is most onerous. While studies have found that some individuals derive positive utility from aspects of commuting, others have shown that traffic congestion can entail important time, monetary, and mental stress costs. Moreover, responses to traffic congestion-related stressors differs by individual characteristics. In response, this research captures how exposure to traffic congestion events, the duration of this exposure, and individual trait susceptibility to congestion affect the utility of commuting.

Continue reading “Congestion and Commute Satisfaction”

Image-led Planning of Rapid Transit Projects

Many rapid transit projects are justified by a desire to achieve intangible city image and branding goals such as promoting messages of modernity, economic growth, global competitiveness, and world city status. The relationship between rapid transit and city image is poorly understood in the planning literature. In response, this article presents a theoretical framework of rapid transit in image-led planning. The framework and examples of rapid transit in image-led planning in practice reveal that while important, rapid transit alone is not a sufficient condition for wholesale image change, and image-led planning must be mindful of a host of important practical considerations.

Continue reading “Image-led Planning of Rapid Transit Projects”

Characterizing Potential EV Adopters in Canada

This article presents a two-stage structural equation modelling and segmentation process to identify likely electric vehicle adopters in Canada. Using a sample of 3505 households who have expressed an interest in the future purchase of an economy car, the paper operationalizes an extended version of the Theory of Planned Behaviour in a structural equation model to quantify the impacts of personal beliefs on individual adoption intention towards electric vehicles. Model results show that attitude, perceived behavioural control, and norms (moral and subjective) have significant direct impacts on behavioural intention, while a household’s concern for the environment has an indirect impact.

Continue reading “Characterizing Potential EV Adopters in Canada”

40 Years of Rapid Transit’s Land Value Uplift

Identifying and measuring the land value uplift (LVU) impacts of rapid transit are important for a number of reasons. However, despite the general notion that rapid transit does confer positive LVU benefits, our comprehensive and critical review of more than 130 analyses across 60 studies completed in North America over the past 40 years finds significant heterogeneity in research outcomes, leaving many significant questions unanswered. Beyond high-level differences in study inputs, we argue that a fundamental source of variability is a lack of empirical specificity from the use of proximity as the dominant way in which LVU benefits are captured.

 

Continue reading “40 Years of Rapid Transit’s Land Value Uplift”

Latent Class Model of TOD in Toronto

Transit oriented development (TOD), which is generally understood as the provision of higher-density, mixed- use, amenity-rich, and walkable development around rapid transit stations, has been championed as one of the most effective solutions for maximizing the potential return on investment for existing and future rapid tran- sit infrastructure projects. But it is clear that not all implementations of TOD are the same in every station catch- ment area across a transit network. This heterogeneity in station area contexts presents significant complexity for planners and policymakers interested in understanding existing TOD conditions, an area’s TOD potential, and the relevant policy and planning interventions required to achieve planning goals. It also creates complications for researchers interested in associating station contexts with various TOD outcomes.

 

Continue reading “Latent Class Model of TOD in Toronto”